Throwback Thursday: Shrivelled Rose

Here we have another image taken with the Pentacon 100/2.8. I told you a bit more about that lens last year. It’s a violet blooming rose. The rose in the image was really blooming in violet.

I really like the small field of depth, especially when using the lens for taking macro images. Although, you can’t really speak of macro images, when having a minimum distance of about 60-70 cm from your subject.

Take care!

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Travel Tuesday: fearless sanderlings

 

sanderling (Calidris alba) / Sanderling

One can only marvel that these little birds are running so close in the surf to pull their food out of the sand. On the one hand, that they are not afraid of the waves and, on the other hand, that they even find food among the sand.

Take care!

 

Monochrome Madness 4-51

It’s still coupling season for the grey seals. So, this big male tries to convince the smaller female below him to give him a try 🙂 Despite this looks like a fight, it wasn’t.

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole for more than four years now. Look at here site on Wednesday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

A loving couple

Monochromia

sic – yes, it’s a loving couple in the image above. The image is taken earlier this year during the mating season of the grey seals on Helgoland, a small island 60 km from the German coast in the middle of the North Sea. The North Sea is a part of the Atlantic ocean, located between the British main Island, Germany, Denmark and Scandinavia.

During the 1970 they were completely exterminated in the whole Deutsche Bucht (German Bight). From the late 1980s they re-conquered a sandbank near Amrum. That sandbank became a bridgehead for repopulating the German Bight again. Recently, I saw a report saying there were more than 12,000 grey seals in the German Bight again.

The grey seals get their babies during winter. It’s also their mating season. While the first wild grey seal was born in winter 1996/97, there were about 100 babies in 2011. 2016 there were already…

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Throwback Thursday: editing cranes with Luminar 2018 Jupiter!

Recently, I got a review version of the upcoming version “Luminar 2018″ V. 1.2.0 Jupiter. for a short time.

Upgrade was as easy as usual: simply drawing the app in my Applications folder. I had the feeling, the software start doesn’t need as long as before. The interface seemed familiar without any noticeable changes. All presets seemed to be still available. Also, the workflow is the same.

So, I took some of my images for my crane trip last fall and developed them from raw again.

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APS-C, 800mm (~1200mm), f8, ISO 400, 1/6400s

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35mm, 155mm, ISO 800, f7.1, 1/500s

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APS-C, 800mm (~1200mm), ISO 3200, f5.6, 1/125s

I was quite impressed by the results when comparing the outcome with the one from last fall using Luminar V. 1.0.0: more details, better results in the mid-tones and much better noise-reduction. The noise reduction is so good now, than I’m considering deleting the old app “Noiseless CK”.

For me, a good noise reduction is crucial. When doing wildlife photography, I have to use high ISO settings because I want very short shutter speeds for getting sharp images. You know the apertures triangle: ISO, shutter speed and aperture. As I usually have to use long focal lenses, which are not so fast as shorter focal lenses because of physical limitations. Additionally, the longer a lens, the smaller the field of depth is. This brings in another level of light shortage.

Some of the other new features are:

  • higher speed during import and processing
  • automatic distortion correction
  • improved Demosaicing and green balance
  • support of DCP profiles (Mac)
  • higher speed when importing raw images (Mac)
  • the functionality of the Windows version is adapted to the Mac version by adding support for batch processing, free transformation, rotation and mirroring

Luminar 2018 Jupiter comes as a free upgrade for all current users of Luminar 2018. Users having a previous version of Luminar are eligible for upgrading on a reduced rate. For those of you, not having Luminar already, might consider giving it a try. There’s a free evaluation version available for download for MacOS and for Windows.

When using this code “SOLANER” you can save some money and get your perks anyway 😃.

Take care!