art, Computer, photography, technic

Why should I do the extra work for using raw instead of jpg out-of-cam?

1_40Most, if not all, digital cameras come preconfigured by the manufacturer to save the photos in jpg format. This format is standardized by the Joint Photographic Experts Group, usually written as an acronym JPEG. You can recognize files following this standard by their extension .JPG or .JPEG.

The jpg format has a lossy compression algorithm to shrink the file size. The compression level is usually leveled by fine, good, moderate, web, small size or in percent levels. Regardless of the notation, the higher the quality, the bigger the files. Or to change the angle of view: the higher the compression, the worse the quality.

JPG has also another design problem. It only uses 8 bit for coding the colors. Each color is assembled by leveling the three color channels red, green and blue (RGB). I.e. a white point is saved a 100% red, 100% green and 100% blue. Thus you need 3 byte (1 for each color channel) for storing 1 pixel. Assuming, your camera sensor has a resolution of 3000×2000 pixel, you can easily calculate the size for a photo: 3000 x 2000 x 3 = 18000000 = 18000 kilo-byte = 18 mega-byte.
The compression algorithm tries to find neighboring pixel of similar (not same!!) levels in all of their 3 color channels and sets them as equal to save space. Especially in nice color gradients like skies at sunset you will see serious problems: the colors don’t blend smooth, but change in bigger steps instead. Very ugly. Have a look in the attached screenshot below.

Higher-quality and semi-professional cameras support more than 8 bit in their sensors. They use 12, 14 or even 16 bit for each of the three color channels. This results in 4096, 16383 or 65535 color nuances per channel instead of 256 when using 8 bit. Do you see the difference?
So, your camera is recording a scene with a color depth of 14 bit (thats 16383 color nuances), just like mine and JPG only uses 8 of them (for 256 nuances). How can this work? It works by compressing similar tones to only one. The result is, you’re loosing much of your details in the mid-tones, in the darks and in the highlights. While the highlights will tend to turn to white, the darks will tend to turn black.

One of the loopholes might be, using TIFF instead of JPG. This format preserves all information, because it uses 16 bit for each color channel and does not use any compression. The downside of this quality is the size. Using the same values as above a TIFF file would eat up 36 mega-byte. Or, by using values from my camera: while a JPG usually uses between 10 an 12 MB, a TIFF file has 155 MB.

Many cameras have another option: raw files! These files are called raw files, because they are stored without any touching inside the camera. They preserve all bits recorded by the sensor and use a lossless compression. But, these formats are camera dependant. Each manufacturer uses his own format and to make this even worse, it is different for each camera model. When using this format, each of my photos needs about 20-30 MB of storage space. And these raw files aren’t ready for use. They have to be developed in post-production, just like the films in analog times.

So, why should you use this option? There are already TIFF and JPG in place? Why shout I invest much more time for post-production? And, why should I invest more money in software, when I can get ready to use photos right out of my camera? My print shop ony takes JPG anyway.

That depends! Think of the color depth I mentioned earlier. You could get better quality prints by spreading the tones, lighten the darks and darken the highlights in post-production. So, you can get a more natural ambience without huge black and / or white areas without details. Another option is, you can change a few basic settings like the white-balance or slightly shifting the aperture lossless. And higher quality print shops also accept TIFF-file, and they know, why 🙂 Look at the web site of your print shop for accepted file formats.

So, you only can win by using raw-files. There is software available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows for doing the necessary work called “the digital darkroom”. This name derived from the darkroom necessary in film days for developing the film and to process the film negatives to prints.

There’s a huge variety in products available. You don’t need to use Adobe’s Lightroom. There’s even software available as open-source for free and maybe even from your camera manufacturer using optimized setting for your camera and the lenses.

I attached a 100% crop from one of my photos taken last month in Belgium to demonstrate the (bad) effect. I shrinked the quality level to 40% before clipping out this part of the upper left corner of the sky. Keep in mind, depending on the dye distribution in a certain photo, the effect becomes visual earlier or later. Sometimes this effect is already there, when using a quality level of 80% on other photos it appears not until 50%. For my photos, I don’t use any compression.

Click on the photo, to see the effect better. Below I attached the original photo. Feel free, to drop me a note, a question or a suggestion in the box below.

Take care!

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architecture, art, history, photo-of-the-day, photography, technic, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 39

dsc_6653-e1t_wThis photo is taken 4 weeks ago, when I attended the monthly photographers roundtable.

I really love this photo with all those stones in the creek and the trees on the sides. I love the light falling through the leaves, sparkling the ground and creating light effects on the water surface.

Because of the huge amount of details and the interesting structures I put it back into the lab to rework it in black-and-white by using MacPhun Tonality Pro. And here we are: my contribution to Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness. Head over, there are usually many more monochrome photos from other talented photographers all over the world.

Take care!

(as always: click on the photos to see them in a bigger size)

Btw. I’d encourage you to give it a try. You can download a trial version for free and you can still use a 10% discount by using this code: solaner10

 edit: I forgot to mention, there is currently a special discount: Save $80 on the Creative Kit Plus (Black Friday Special) & get a $25 Amazon or Apple iTunes Gift Card with purchase.
Valid: Nov 25 – Dec 1
Details: Creative Kit Plus includes all 4 award-winning Mac photo software products (Tonality Pro, Intensify Pro, Focus Pro 2 and Snapheal Pro) worth $210 (if purchased separately) for JUST $129.99. Nearly 40% off (an $80 savings). Plus, customers from the United States get a $25 gift card of their choice from the Amazon or iTunes stores with purchase of the Creative Kit Plus.

architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

Inside of La Sagrada Familia

600_7521-e_wHere we are! Inside one of the most amazing buildings I’ve ever seen!

This church has extremely much light inside, compared to other churches. Not only because of the glass windows at every side, but also from above. The whole church is inspired by a forest. Huge trees (the columns) are carrying the roof of leaves and branches. Between these leaves the natural light is able to reach the ground. Here you have the same, light channels are leading light from the sky inside the church. Also a technique, Antonio Gaudi used before: in Palau de la Musica. Even the big plates with the symbols of the evangelists are illuminated from behind by natural light.

The photo above was my first photo inside, right on our way to the towers, when the inside wasn’t much crowded. On the other hand, this inner circle with the benches was guarded, to give prayers a room.

Take care!

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architecture, art, history, photo-of-the-day, photography, technic, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 38

600_7496-ec_wTodays photo for Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness is taken in Barcelona earlier this year. Those, who follow my blog on a regular basis, might have recognized the photo. I was one of the photos in the gallery from the towers of La Sagrada Familia and I showed it last week already. But, that’s not completely true.

Although the photo, taken inside one of the towers, is a natural-born monochromatic photo, I converted it to bw with MacPhun Tonality Pro. I started again with one of the basic presets and adjusted the controls to bring out the fine structures in the stones. (btw. just in case, anyone is interested in a complete walk-through, just drop me a line).

These towers are really tight and you really need your hands. I guess, each stop is only 50 cm broad and you can’t pass anyone before you, expect on one of the few platforms or bridges to the neighbor towers. As you can see, you have a handrail on the right. On the left you have none, but the staircase is so steep, that the winding stone limiting the steps will be your handrail on to left.

The photo is taken handhold with an ultra-wide lens, a so-called fisheye. Beside carrying a tripod is forbidden, as I mentioned in my post last week, you won’t have enough room to set it up. Thus, your camera should be able to bring good results even in high iso. The downside of using a fisheye is, pay attention to your feet, hands, jacket and other visitors. You will definitely have some disturbing objects in your photo, if you don’t.

Take care!

(as always: click on the photos to see them in a bigger size)

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Btw. I’d encourage you to give it a try. You can download a trial version for free and you can still use a 10% discount by using this code: solaner10

art, photo-of-the-day, photography, technical

Weekly Photo Challenge: achievement

This weeks photo challenge at The Daily Post is called “achievement”.

When I have had my first job and my first car, there was a dream of driving along the river Loire in France and visiting all those beautiful chateaus. Unfortunately, I don’t speak french, but my younger brother does. So, we planned during his summer holidays at school to do that trip together. The proposed finish was at Mt. St. Michel at the Atlantic Ocean between Brittany and the Normandy.

Unfortunately, that plan never came to reality. I can’t remember, why. But, back in 2011 a dream came true! I stood at the foot of the hill and was able to walk up and see that impressive island with my own eyes. Finally, I managed to realize one of my dreams.

Take care!

(as always: click on the photo to see it in a bigger size)

architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

above the city and the narrow paths back to earth

600_7448-e_wYou can also visit the towers of La Sagrada Familia. Currently the church has 8 towers, four at the Christmas front side and four at the Easter front side. The plan is, to build another four on each of the other sides. These twelve towers will represent the twelve apostles. The next four will be set up inside the circle of the twelve and representing the four evangelists. All of these will be towered over by one middle tower, representing Jesus Christ. When visiting the church, don’t forget to exit the building at the Christmas side and have a look at the model, showing the church in its finished state. It’s really amazing. I included a photo of each of the four sides of the church in my gallery, although they aren’t good. The model is behind heavy mirroring glass 😦

But, back the towers. As I wrote above, you can visit the towers and have to decide for one of the two sides, when ordering your tickets. Beside choosing you entrance time while buying your ticket, you have to choose the time for entering the towers, if you want. We were extremely lucky to have chosen 9:15h for our visit of the towers. Later I met people, who were unlucky, because to towers became closed because of heavy wind. When we were there, the Easter side towers were closed, so we were on top of the Christmas side. The elevator is reachable from the outside. It’s a bit hidden and now signs led us in the right direction. So here is my description: Leave the building at the Christmas side and turn left. There you can find a quite smaller entrance bringing you to the elevator. It’s forbidden to bring a bag, rucksack or so with you, but they have lockers (with a glass front) to store your bags.

The small elevator brings up to four people to the top of the tower. You leave it at the bridge level (look at my photos in the post on the Christmas front to get an idea). On your way down you can change the towers at several places. The stairs are really extremely narrow, so a bag or a rucksack really would hinder you.

Beside interesting details, you have a fantastic view over the city and the beach.

Enjoy!

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art, landscape, meeting, photography

A kind of art?

Today I want to show you three photos, also taken last week during our monthly photographers roundtable, but they are very different from the photos I usually put here in my blog. Although they are so different, there is no post-processing in them. Only landscape, light, my camera and I.

I came up with a new idea and when looking on the camera screen I liked the result. When looking on them at home on the the big computer screen, I still liked them. What do you think? I’d like to read your comments in the box below.

Although I put them here in a slightly bigger size in the post, they are at the same size as all of my other photos. As always, just click on them to see them bigger 🙂

Take care!

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architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

The Easter Front of La Sagrada Familia

600_7424_wLast week I introduced you to the Christmas Front of La Sagrada Familia. This week we walk around the church to the opposite side and have a look on the Easter front, where you can find the entrance for the common visitors.

Here we have a very different sculpturing style compared to the Christmas front. The complete story of easter is modeled in stone around the entrance. Try to find the roman soldiers and look at their helmets. What do you see? I see, they are looking gust like the fairy chimneys on to of Casa Milà.

When comparing the buildings, Antonio Gaudí has built, you can always find similarities. His whole designing live was inspired by organic structures and he used these ideas always.

Next, we’ll go inside the church and visit the towers.

Stay tuned!

Take care!

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art, history, landscape, photo-of-the-day, photography, seasons, technic, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 36

600_1390-t_wThis week I picked another photo taken a the Belgium coast for Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness. In case, you like these kind of photos, I recommend you following the link to her site and see many more wonderful photos in bw.

This one is taken at the first evening in Flandern, right after our arrival. We moved all our luggage in the vacation home and went for a first sight to the coast. We’ve had a fantastic evening with a dreamy sunset and a beautiful sky. The chosen photo was originally in color, as you already might have guessed. And, you also might have seen it in my post about three weeks ago.

It’s also converted with MacPhun Tonality Pro. I shifted the White Balance to the left and increased the contrast a bit. I also increased the highlights a bit for a brighter sky. A sepia toning and the dark oval vignette are finishing the look-and-feel of a photo taken about a hundred years ago.

Take care!

Btw. I’d encourage you to give it a try. You can download a trial version for free and you can also use a 10% discount by using this code: solaner10

culture, history, landscape, meeting, photography, seasons, travel, world

Monthly photographers roundtable

dsc_6738-e_wYesterday I met with some other photographers for our monthly roundtable. You know, it’s not literally a roundtable for sitting and chatting, but walking and taking photographs.

This time we were in a valley nearby. The valley proposed several remains from the industrial revolution, back in the 18th and 19th century. We expected to see some of the old grinding shops, groundwood mills and knife forges. But, we only found creeks, ponds, forest and signs, telling what kind of workshop once was in that place. Once, more then 10 of these workshops were beside those creeks. Nevertheless, we have had a wonderful afternoon: November 1st and t-shirt weather, what a surprise.

So, instead of showing some industry culture, I’m able to show some autumn photos from one of our local forests.

Enjoy and
take care!

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