The Côte d’Albâtre

20150725_175016-610_9596-s_wThe Côte d’Albâtre (literally the Alabaster Coast) is part of the French coast of the English Channel. It takes its name from the white hue of its high chalk cliffs, which stretch for over 120 km, dominating most of the coastline. It is part of the same geological system as the White Cliffs of Dover on the other side of the English Channel.

The cliffs consist primarily of white chalk and flintstones. They are between 75 and 105m high. Below, you can find many, many round washed and polished stones, once embedded in the chalk, but now forming the beaches, because of wind and water have eroded the chalk. So, the remaining flintstones form the beaches.

The Côte d’Albâtre was a favourite subject of Impressionist painters, including Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and was frequented by composers associated with sea such as Claude Debussy and Albert Roussel. Other artists who painted the coastline include Gustave Courbet and Eugène Boudin.

Take care!

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2 thoughts on “The Côte d’Albâtre

  1. Pingback: The natural monuments of Étretat | MyBlog - solaner

  2. Pingback: Inventing a new style of painting | MyBlog - solaner

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