Inventing a new style of painting

20150725_175951-610_9644_wIn the 1870s there was a revolution in painting in France. Claude Monet, a french painter (1840-1926) came to Honfleur, a very small town in Normandy. He came to Honfleur for an exhibition and for painting, where his style of painting impressed the visitors very much. A newspaper editor took the name of one of his paintings “Impression, soleil levant” (Impression, Sunrise), to name his review of that exhibition: “L’Exposition des Impressionnistes”. He has not the only painter working in this style, that was faced harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France.

Impressionist painting characteristics include relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. (from wikipedia)

Claude Monet liked to paint in Normandy, especially in Le Havre, Honfleur and Étretat. He loved the special light here at the sea.

20150726_143747-610_9945_wTwo of his paintings of the natural monuments of Étretat are set up as weatherproof reproduction copies at the beach of Étretat. They stand in the locations, where Claude Monet has stood to create these painting.

I like this idea to bring the art back to its origin.

In my lasts posts, I focused on the cliffs and the gorgeous natural monuments here in Étretat. If you’ve missed them, go back and have a look.

Enjoy!

 

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3 thoughts on “Inventing a new style of painting

  1. Pingback: Visiting Claude Monet at home | MyBlog - solaner

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