art, landscape, photography, seasons, technic, travel, world

Throwback Thursday: photographing the invisible lights


I took this image about 6 years ago with an old DSLR (introduced to the markets in 2004). That camera only has a very weak high-pass filter in front of the sensor, so it is able to capture invisible parts of the light, too. The high-pass filter is designed to prevent the invisible portions of the light from reaching the sensor for getting better images.

To get sharp images in IR you have to adjust the focus. IR has a different behaviour when it comes to sharpness, then the visible light. Each wavelength has its own behaviour. In IR the sharpness point is a bit to the left. I.e. when focussing on an object 5 m in front of you, you have to shift the focus back a bit i.e. to 3.50m. You have to find out the correct setting by try-and-error. Back in film days nearly every lens has had these extra marks on the distance control for IR. Thus, I recommend using an old lens for IR photography. Anyway, use your display and check your images carefully for sharpness – despite it is very hard to recognise sharpness in all the reds on the small screen. 🙂

For the above image I put an 720nm IR filter on front of my lens for blocking all rays with a wave-length shorter than 720nm. I also have a 760nm IR filter for monochrome images. These filters extends the exposure time enormously. I have to use exposure times of about 1 second and above in full sun during the day. Thus I have to put my camera on top of a tripod, despite the sun 😦 To make things even harder, the filter in front of the lens won’t let visible light coming through. That makes the viewfinder dark. You can’t choose the right angle of view. Either you guess it, or you’re constantly detach and re-attach the filter to your lens for every image. Have fun 🙂

I like to let the filter in front of my lens and guess the right angle. It’s more fun and more interesting seeing the results. First of all, I do a manual white balance on green grass in full sun. Next, I dial in f8, ISO 400 (to shorten the exposure time a bit) and 1 second as a starting point. Photographing in raw is my default, so I don’t have to change this setting for IR.

I don’t have modified my camera to remove the highpass filter. That’s about 400€ depending on the exact kind of camera. On the other hand, you will not only get the filter removed (you get back short exposure times), but also the focus justified permanently. So, you don’t have to worry about the focus correction I mentioned above. You also usually get back a bright view finder. But the camera now has a certain filter inside: the camera is defined! And you’re not able to switch the filter i.e. to check out other wave-lengths.

For the above image I’ve used a filter, that didn’t block all visible light. So, I can get these color IR images.

I used an old APS-C DSLR, an old 28-70mm lens (qualified for capturing IR images), a tripod, a remote shutter release and much of sun 🙂 That’s not very wide (like 42mm on a FX camera). I wish, I’d have a wider lens. But, in film days they didn’t have had APC-C SLRs. So, such lenses aren’t available. 😦 I also won’t use a more modern DX lens, because they aren not tested under IR light. So, you probably see flares inside the lens resulting in ugly hotspots.

Take care!

P.S. it’s also possible to photograph in ultraviolet. But, in that part of the spectrum I don’t have any experiences – sorry guys.

animals, art, mammal, nature, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: gaining new land

 

Here at the north sea, people are trying to protect the land from the sea. This aim exists for centuries. The beach area protects to land. But, during heavy winter storms, a beach can be removed easily by wind and waves. Thus, in some areas the people set these lines of poles in the tidal area to reduce the speed of the water movement. So, some particles are able to settle near the poles and over time salty meadows grow. That’s a very sensible area, but very valuable for many birds.

In the above image, the meadow is still growing. During high tide the water circles the gras areas and builds uncountable tiniest islands. Over time, more and more grass will grow and avoid water coming here during a regular flood. Only very hight tides will be able to over flood the grass again. The bigger the meadows are and the longer the distance for the ocean is to cover, the less waves are able to fight against the dikes. That’s how protecting the land works.

Take care!

 

art, landscape, nature, photography, postprocessing, seasons

Monochrome Madness 4-19

Here we have one of my old IR images. Shot with a not converted APS-C DSLR mounted on my tripod by using a manual focus 28 mm lens with a 720nm IR filter. More on IR on Thursday.

This image is developed by using ufraw and gimp. The conversion to monochrome is done with Tonality pro.

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!


 

 

architecture, culture, history, landscape, people, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: beach chairs

These beach chairs are very typical for the German coasts. You can find them not only at the beaches of the North sea and the Baltic sea, but nowadays also at some lakes in the northern parts of Germany and even in private gardens of lovers of the Germany coasts.

Take care!

 

art, landscape, nature, photography, seasons

Monochrome Madness 4-18

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!


 

 

art, culture, landscape, people, photography, seasons, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: building castles


I guess, it’s a universal idea: when having a sandy beach, kids start digging and building castles or towers, just like the kid in the image above. The parents probably have rent one of the beach chairs and observing their hard-working kid from their shady and wind safe comfortable place. Maybe they are reading or simply dozing and enjoying their vacation.

Take care!

 

art, cityscape, landscape, nature, photography, seasons

Monochrome Madness 4-17

Finally a (sun)day worth being called a mid-summer day. Only a few more days and the wheat will get harvested.

These hot summer afternoons with crisp blue skies and a few white clouds are ideal for taking monochrome images. Takin either a yellow, a red or an orange filter to get such an amazing sky.

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!