abstract, animals, art, insect, landscape, world

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #71 ‚Äď Creepy

This week it’s Leya‘s turn to challenge us. She asks for something creepy, and she gets something really creepy ūüôā

The Pterophoridae or plume moths are a family of Lepidoptera with unusually modified wings. Though they belong to the Apoditrysia like the larger moths and the butterflies, unlike these they are tiny and were formerly included among the assemblage called “microlepidoptera”. – Wikipedia

I stumbled upon this creepy insect a few years ago and already wrote about it. Here you can see another image taken from a different point of view.

A plume moth is a kind of moth, a many-plumed moth. I never saw one before, so it was a very scary moment. The moth is about 2-3 cm long and the spread wings approximately 4-5 cm.

It is pale-white and the legs have thorns. Considering that moths are usually not very pretty, this one looks like it has escaped from a nightmare.

Take care!

animals, bird, insect, photo-of-the-day, photography, seasons, world

Throwback Thursday: may beetle

In the past, I stressed the enormous¬†decrease in insects and birds several times. And I’m willing to do it again every now and then, simply to remind you, you’re also responsible to take action against this.

How can you do so? Avoid biocides, pesticides, herbicides, and insecticides. Support areas, where local plants are blooming. Don’t call the herbs pest plants. Establish an area in your garden with blooming plants, by spaying seeds to feed bees and other insects. Set up so-called¬†insect hotels. These are special places, where insects can find hides and places to grow their offspring.¬†As a result, many bird species will find food.

It’s not only for the birds. It’s also for our own food. Without insects, many of our food-plants won’t exist. Plants keep the fertile soil in place. They also keep the water in place. Without plants, the wind will erode the soil. Our own future depends on the availability of water and food. Lack of water and food (and work) in certain regions brings people to migrate¬†to other countries. So, if you don’t want more people coming to your country, help them having enough (work), food and water in their own region. Therefore fight against climatic changes. Help, reducing pollution and global warming.

Take care!

animals, bird, insect, photo-of-the-day, photography, seasons, world

Throwback Thursday: in-flight swallow


Recently, I showed you an image of an in-flight bee fly. Although it was hard to capture that tiny insect with the long focal-length lens, it was not that hard as capturing this image of an in-flight swallow. Despite, bee flies are very small, their flight is kind of predictable. They are not flight that quick and they are not changing the directions abruptly. They also stay on nearly the same level above the plants.

Barn swallows instead are flying very quickly because they are hunting flying insects and thus changing their flight direction and hight unpredictable. Compared to this, the bee fly simply ‘stands still’ in the air, although¬†she was also constantly moving.

This image is from early April and I was very surprised to see a barn swallow so early. The air was still cold (below 10¬įC). As far as I know, that’s the minimum temperature¬†for insects to be able to fly.

There were years when swallows came back from the south too early when the air was still cold. The air had temperatures too cold for insects to fly which resulted in hungry swallows. Hunting for flying insects was without results, because of the cold. So they were forced to walk around and pick plant lice from the bushes because they were too weak to fly from all the unsuccessful hunts. A friend of mine, a nature conservationist, reported that year swallows simply falling off the sky. They died of hunger while flying.

I was in that place before and met hundreds of swallows. But, it was June and warm. So I was surprised to see one (two on the next day).

 

Take care!

animals, insect, photography, seasons, wildlife, world

Throwback Thursday: bee fly

bee fly or humblefly (Bombylius major) / Wollschweber

I didn’t see these guys for years. It’s a¬†bee flies or humblefly.¬†They were dancing each spring above the forsythias. But, for years I wasn’t able to see any. The owner of another blog posted about them a few days ago. So, I got reminded to my own experiences with them. It was a really hard job to catch one with my camera.

APS-C, 500mm, f8, ISO 800, 1/1600

Take care!