Wordless Wednesday: Bad Hair Day

Highland Cattle / Schottische Hochlandrind

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Travel Tuesday: I see you!

 

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Monochrome Madness 4-51

It’s still coupling season for the grey seals. So, this big male tries to convince the smaller female below him to give him a try 🙂 Despite this looks like a fight, it wasn’t.

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole for more than four years now. Look at here site on Wednesday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

A loving couple

Monochromia

sic – yes, it’s a loving couple in the image above. The image is taken earlier this year during the mating season of the grey seals on Helgoland, a small island 60 km from the German coast in the middle of the North Sea. The North Sea is a part of the Atlantic ocean, located between the British main Island, Germany, Denmark and Scandinavia.

During the 1970 they were completely exterminated in the whole Deutsche Bucht (German Bight). From the late 1980s they re-conquered a sandbank near Amrum. That sandbank became a bridgehead for repopulating the German Bight again. Recently, I saw a report saying there were more than 12,000 grey seals in the German Bight again.

The grey seals get their babies during winter. It’s also their mating season. While the first wild grey seal was born in winter 1996/97, there were about 100 babies in 2011. 2016 there were already…

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Travel Tuesday: common seal

 

In the past, I’ve shown you some images of grey seals. Today, I have a common seal for you.

Common seals are smaller than grey seals. Males are approximately 170 cm, females 140 cm and weight 150 respectively 100 kg).

While grey seals are curious and sociably, common seal are shy and solitary. Grey seals are laying in groups together, while common seals keep a distance of 2 or 3 meters to each other, whenever possible. They are stressed when a sand bench is too full.

Gray seals get their babies during winter and they don’t cry when left alone by their mother for hunting. Common seals instead, get their babies in summer and these are the ones, called howler (abandoned seal pup).

While grey seals choose beaches for resting, common seals prefer sand benches for resting. But, sand benches are usually only usable during low tide. At high tide, the sand benches are usually under water. Other then grey seals, common seal babies are born with the ability to swim. Birth size and weight are 85 cm and 10 kg. So, that’s not a problem to react to high tide. They are fed by their mother for about 5 weeks and than left alone.

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Travel Tuesday: baby seal

Do you remember the image I showed you six weeks ago? The image of a new-born seal.

Today, I have another baby for you. But, this one is a ‘bit’ older. It’s born on January 2nd and the photo is taken on January 17th. So, it’s two weeks old. Compare the two images. Gray seals get fed with milk by their mother for only 3 – 4 weeks. Every day their weight rises enormously. They weigh 10 – 15 kg at birth. Every day, the weight increases by 1-2 kg. After that, the mother leaves them alone at the beach. Their fur changes from the soft white to the ticker grey fur, dense enough to swim. The babies can’t go swimming as long as they have their white fur. After changing fur, as an adolescent they are able to go in the water and start learning hunting on their own.

Take care!

 

Monochrome Madness 4-43

 

 

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Wednesday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!