flowers, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, plants, seasons, spring, world

Throwback Thursday: what a surprise

You know, it’s spring. The week before Easter we had very nice and warm weather: around 20°C. But Holy Saturday, the weather changed much and the temperature dropped. Tuesday after Easter we even got snow. 10-15 cm over night and heavy snowfall all day. Although most of the snow melted in the evening, the next morning looked the same as the morning before: again 10-15 cm of snow.

Here we have our pink tulip tree covered with snow. Most of the small spring flowers were completely covered with snow. Only a few of the bigger ones were able to look out of the snow as you can see in my image of yesterday. Here in Germany, we have a saying: April, April, der macht, was er will (The April does what he wants to). So, the intermezzo is already over again, and no snow anymore.

Take care!

flowers, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, seasons, travel, world

Throwback Thursday: plenty of snow

 

10 years ago, overnight we got a lot of snow. About half a meter in just a couple of hours. For years we didn’t get that much of snow. Since then, we got some snow, but not that much and not in that short amount of time. When I’m remembering correctly, there were even years without any snow. In a past post, I wrote a bit more about the environmental conditions for my region. You can find it here.

The landscape looks very nice when covered with (freshly fallen) snow, but on the streets, the snow is very dangerous. I makes the streets slippery, so you can fall down easily and the stopping distance of vehicles becomes much longer.

Take care!

 

culture, flowers, landscape, nature, photography, seasons, travel, world

plants in the Icelandic highlands

In my last post I started to show you some of the Icelandic plants. Today I have some more plants. These plants grow in the highlands.

600_2530-ecc_wIn the highlands you can find many, many mosses and lichens. But, can also find tiny blooming plants: i.e.

  • Silene acaulis, known as moss campion or cushion pink (Stängelloses Leimkraut)
  • Silene uniflora Roth (Klippen-Leimkraut / Einblütiges Leimkraut)
  • Armeria (Grasnelke)
  • Chamerion latifolium (formerly Epilobium latifolium) known as Dwarf Fireweed or River Beauty Willowherb (Arktisches Weidenröschen)
  • Dryas octopetala, common names include mountain avens, eightpetal mountain-avens, white dryas, and white dryad (Silberwurz)

I’m not a biologist, nor a botanist. Thus, I might have errors in the latin names. I got them by using Wikipedia and a German web-site dedicated to traveling Scandinavia. I’m quite sure about the German names noted inside the brackets, because I made notes from the explanations by our guide on Iceland and compared my photos very carefully to the sample photos on Wikipedia to be as accurate as possible.

Take care!

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culture, flowers, landscape, nature, photography, seasons, travel, world

plants on Iceland

600_6597-e_wUntil now, I showed you much of the fantastic landscapes of Iceland. I guess, you noticed, there aren’t lots of trees around although many parts of the landscape are green. And that’s true. So far in the north, trees need very long time to grow. And in the past centuries (the vikings arrived more than 1.000 years ago and started settling back in lat 9th century). Over the centuries the trees were cut for building houses, ships and for cooking / heating. Thus you can’t find any forests anymore expect small grove, planted by farmers.

Nowadays, you can find many greenhouses for growing food (i.e. sweet pepper, tomatoes and so on). They are heated by geothermal sources. But this is not our todays topic.

Today and in my next post I want to show you several plants, I found. I want to start in the lowlands and more urban parts of Iceland, while my next posts will be dedicated to the plants in the highlands.

Many parts in the lowlands are covered by different kinds of grass. In wet areas you can find blooming cotton grass during summer and angelic, the source for a schnaps (kind of hard liquor). Huge areas are covered by lupines (did you know, you can use the seeds of lupines to make coffee?). They were planted to modify the soil and prepare it to plant other useful plants afterwards, but they spread out widely and now cover huge parts of the land. A photo can’t transport the beauty of these huge fields of blooming lupines.

Take care!

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art, flowers, photography, seasons

Monochrome Madness 2-12

 

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This is Burg Eltz (Castle Eltz), a medieval castle founded in the 12th century and expanded several times over the centuries.. This castle was never conquered or destroyed and it is one of the few medieval castles, which remains in their original shape. The castle is still owned by the original family, for more than 800 years now. If you want to know more, I’d recommend Wikipedia. Although the English doc isn’t as long as the German one, it is quite good.

When we have had our own currency, the Deutsche Mark, before getting the Euro in 2001, this castle was pictured on the back of our second highest value bank-note: the 500 DM bill.

Many visitors from many different countries were there, when we visited the castle. but, it wasn’t that crowded. I guess, that’s because travel season hasn’t really started yet. They have a very big parking ground near the castle. Either you have a walk through the forest, you can also walk along the street or take a shuttle bus for a small fee. We took the street for our walk to the castle. A very, very steep street of about 2 km down to the castle. For our walk back to the parking ground we used the other path, through the forest. This path is way easier, although not much longer. But, also the bus fee is quite fair.

The castle is built on a hill surrounded by other, much higher hills. so, it is quite hidden in the landscape. Usually such castles were set up on very prominent places to overview the landscape. They were set up to guard the people, to collect duties from travelers and traveling merchants. So, they were usually built near navigable rivers or important merchant streets. In this context, it is very surprising to find castle Eltz hidden in a valley.

This is my submission for Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness this week. An image of a subject ‘fallen out of time’.

I also included some other photos of the castle in the slideshow below.

Take care!

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flowers, nature, seasons, travel

Many, many flowers

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Spring is the season of flowers, in my opinion. Colorful blossoms are everywhere. So many colorful spots in different shapes on trees, bushes and on the ground. Don’t get me wrong. I know, there are also many flowers blooming during summer or fall. But, I guess, this feeling comes from the lack of these color-spots during winter. The eye gets attracted by all the fresh color after a long, cold and primarily gray-white-black winter.

All these shots were taken last weekend while our trips trough the vineyards above the river Mosel.

Although the vineyards are men-made, you can find many wild herbs beside the paths.

Here we have among others wisteria, genister, chestnut, some apple (? – only the fruits will tell, because I’m not a botanist) trees and wild strawberries. The other ones I’m not familiar with 😦

At this season, you can also find herbs like anemones below beech trees, because the beech tree leaves are still small, so that some light is able to reach the ground. Thus, these plants only in this time have a chance to grow and bloom.

I’d love to get hints, if someone knows some of the plants.

Enjoy your spring!

 

art, flowers, nature, seasons, world

after the rain

610_4203-e_wor even between the rain.

Here we have a very old song, that still nearly everyone knows: “Wochenend und Sonnenschein” (translated to “Weekend and sunshine”). It’s recorded back in 1930 by the Comedian Harmonists, a male a-capella sextet. They sing about a trip to the forest with their darling. (you might find a recording on youtube – either the original recording, a snippet from the movie Comedian Harmonists or at least from Max Raabe, who is very good in their special singing style).

A sunny weekend is also very welcomed by a photographer. But, also a rainy day gives some opportunities to a photographer. Thus, yesterday I was out when the rain finally made a pause. I got my macro lens to capture a few of the wet blossoms. Although I used a macro lens with a focal length of 105 mm I have a least distance of 10 cm between the front lens and my subject. That’s quite ok in most circumstance, but not always.

What can I do, to come closer to my subject, or in different words, how to get the tiny blossoms a bit bigger into my frame.

There are at least two different ways. First, you can get a Close-up filter and screw it in front of your lens, or you can get extension tubes. An extension tube (usually they come in a set of three, each with a different size of 12, 24 and 35 mm) is to be mounted between you camera body and the lens. They don’t have any optical parts inside. They only enlarge the distance between the sensor and the front lens. While doing this, they also shorten the minimum distance between front lens and subject and enlarge the reproduction scale – says: your subject will be enlarged! Great, goal reached! (btw. there is also a flexible version of these extension tubes available: the bellow)

On the other hand, this has also a downside. In the same time, the reproduction scale is enlarged, the focal depth, that’s the size of the field that is sharp in you photo, is reduced.

This brings us to the most important part of doing macro photography: you need a sturdy tripod!

Moving your lens for only a millimeter can ruin your photo. This can be done by a heartbeat, a breath or simply by the usual (and normal) jitter of your muscles. When using the big screen on the back of your camera (live-view), the problem becomes even worse. To cope these tiny movements, use a sturdy tripod, disable the Image stabilization and use a remote shutter release.

When putting your camera on top of a tripod, the Image stabilization technique will result in unsharp photos.  Why? There are slight moments inside the camera to compensate the human’s slight movements I mentioned above. When the camera is mounted on a sturdy tripod, than there are no movements to compensate. So, this results in unsharp photos.

Using a remote shutter is also meant to keep vibrations away from your camera. If available, you also should activate a small wait between folding up of the mirror and opening the camera shutter. This is also meant to keep vibrations away.

Enjoy the spring and take care!

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flowers, seasons

spring is coming :-)

Three weeks ago610_3113-e_w, I wrote a post with photos taken during a hike through the winterly forest.

Much happened since than. Although we have had another snow storm on Monday morning, it really looked like spring today. Yesterday, a sunny day with mild +6°C made me take my camera and have a little walk in one of our parks. Two years ago I noticed snowdrops growing there. But, at that day they were already withered. Last year I was too early and when I came back, they were also already withered. Yesterday I was there at the right time. In German they are called Schneeglöckchen (~little snow bells). They are usually the first blooming flowers and grow despite remaining snow. Crocuses are the next ones to bloom.

The other blooming plants in my photos are crocuses and Christmas rose, a small flower blooming during snowy winter.

Enjoy!

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flowers, photography, travel, world

dps Weekly Photography Challenge – Flowers 2

600_8191-sf_wThis weeks photo challenge at dps is on flowers. Although some people think, photographing flowers would be as easy as eating bread, it’s not that easy. Try it yourself. So, I’m not the typical flower photographer, but every now and then, I try it. I scrolled though my blog and I was very surprised, how many flower photographs are already online here. You can find them with the tags “flower”, “flowers”, “blossom”, “blossoms” and probably a few more. (Does anyone know a tool for editing the categories of many posts at the same time easily?)

Here is a second photo: an orchid (literally 3 of them ans you can see in the gallery below 🙂 )
This one is taken in our living room by using a studio setting: A macro lens, a tripod, a remote for the camera, a black backdrop and 3 manual controlled flashes.

First of all, I had shut the roller shutter at the windows. Next I set the flower on op of a little footstool and the backdrop about half a meter behind. Positioning the flashes is both that trivial. You have to look for shadows. Are they disturbing or appealing and then  rearrange the setting.

I hope, you like them.

Take care!

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culture, flowers, landscape, photography, seasons, travel, world

Living a separate live

600_8450-e_wTulips are sawn by putting onions in the ground. That’s different from i.e. weeds, grass or many flowers. Here you only have tiny seeds, often not much
bigger than pinhead. Thus, you won’t expect to find plants i.e in the unploughed strip or in the boundary ridge.  So, you won’t imagine that such a big seed would get lost. But, it happens, as you can see.

Living in the row means shelter for each single flower. So, i.e. they can stand hard wind easier or cold nights. Although, some of them seemed to have decided to live their own live, separate from the others, more than a meter (more than 3 feet) away from their siblings in the rows. And they are also still standing.600_8417-e_w

It seems to be similar to us. Some people also decide to live their own live, independent from others and different in style.

Respect each individual. Regardless of their origin and their (cultural) background.

Take care!

 

 

culture, flowers, landscape, photography, seasons, travel, world

Living in the wrong neighborhood

600_8414-sc_wWhen I was in the tulip fields last week, I was surprised by a few flowers in the rows. The tulips grow in long rows of tulips of the same color and the same shape – all flowers of the same kind. This is necessary, because, as I also wrote in my last post, the onions are meant to be sold correctly sorted in homogenous collies. But, every now and then, there was a single different flower. The aliens were usually only different in color and / or shape, but I also found hyacinths between the tulips. A funny surprise.

Enjoy!

Maybe you also like some of the other posts. Have a look.

Do you know, you can subscribe to this blog for free and you’ll get a short notice via email for every new post or get notice in you WordPress reader. I won’t use your email for any other purpose. So, give it a try!

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flowers, photography, seasons, world

Weekend wanderings (Hanami)

600_8339-cf_wAbout 5 weeks ago, the white cherries were blooming, but I missed it because of bad weather and a lack of time. Now, the apple trees (left) and pear trees (in complete white) are starting to bloom. Also the pink Japanese Cherry (Prunus serrulata) is currently blooming. Other local names are Hill CherryOriental Cherry or East Asian Cherry. These cherry trees are also called blossom cherry, because they don’t get eatable fruits. They are planted only for their blossoms.

In Japan, they celebrate Hanami every spring. This is a very important  festival and depends solely on the ferry blossoms. They even try to forecast the precise day, when it is about to start (when the first ferry blossoms will open).

This weekend the sky was mostly overcast. But, every now and then a few sun rays found their way to the ground to enlighten the blossoms.

I hope, you enjoy the blossoms too.

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