history, landscape, nature, people, photography, review, seasons, travel, world

I’m back ….

… from my summer vacation.

Although, summer hasn’t started (according to the calendar, summer starts on June 21st), I was on summer vacation and came back Saturday evening. The last 2 weeks I was at the Baltic Sea on the Island Usedom. It’s the most north-eastern part of Germany, next to the border to Poland. Usedom is known for being a very sunny area, so that they advertise with the slogan “the sun-island”. Despite, many parts of Germany suffered from bad weather with heavy rain and even some over-floodings, Usedom was dried out: 3 weeks without any rain, when we arrived. When we arrived we had nearly 30°C, crisp and cloudless blue sky and a smell of salt, resin and blooming flowers.

Not far from our vacation home, there was a white beach with very fine sand. Some beach chairs were waiting to be rented. You know, I love being at the sea. I love walking along the shore, listening to the birds, the soft wind and the sound of the waves.

On Usedom you can find several towns and villages. Not all of them are located at the coast. Usedom is the second largest island of Germany (Rügen is the biggest one, located next to Usedom). The island is 66,4 km broad and a bit shaped like a banana with much bigger ends (up to 23 km) then the middle part. The Baltic sea does not have a huge tide. You often even notice the difference between high tide and low tide.

Usedom is located not of the Germany capitol Berlin only in a about two hours drive distance. So, you can find many people from Berlin, here. At the end of the 18th century, rich people from Berlin started to go for vacation and spotted i.e. Usedom as a beautiful place for recovering from the stress and the dirt in the big city. At first, local farmers and fishers gave rooms to the city-people.

Next, entrepreneurs built villas and mansions for the rich visitors. These houses followed a very certain building style with ideas coming from the ancient greeks and romans. Today, that style is known as “Bäderarchitektur” (Resort architecture). I’ll show you some more examples in future posts. Fortunately, most of them are already well reconstructed and in very good shape.

To make the trip more comfortable, the coastal towns built piers in addition to the railway stations. So, the people were able to come by ship and have not only a comfortable stay but also a comfortable trip. We were for your stay in Ahlbeck, the town with the oldest pier. You can see it in the image above.

In the urban hinterland, you can discover many interesting villages by bike. The island has a dense network of bicycle tracks. Most of the island is quite flat, so you don’t have many problems with hills or so (despite, there are a few). You can even find a few lakes on the Island.

Take care!

art, landscape, nature, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 4-52

The number 52 is up again in the title. So, another year of Monochrome Madness has come to its end. It’s the 4th year, that is over now. But, nothing to cry upon. Celebrate the anniversary with me.

To celebrate this anniversary, I had a look on my images published during the last 52 weeks and picked my favourite images from that pile. Here they are:

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

art, landscape, nature, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 4-48

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

art, landscape, nature, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 4-46

Who said, in landscape photography, you don’t need big telephoto lenses? The above image taken from Helgoland shows the southern beach of the small neighbour island Düne with the lighthouse you already know, when you’re a frequent reader of this blog.

DX, 310mm (= 465 mm FX), f/5.6, ISO 800, 1/2000

The longer the lens, the heavier it is. The heavier a lens is, the more likely you’ll get unsharp blurry images because of unintentional tiniest camera movements (i.e. a breath or simply a heartbeat).  That’s especially true, when standing on of of a cliff during heavy weather or a storm. A tripod might help a bit, but sometimes the wind is strong enough to move the whole tripod. So, only very short exposure times can help, getting a sharp image.

 

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

art, culture, landscape, nature, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 4-42

 

This rock needle is one of the landmarks of Helgoland. This most iconic symbol for the whole island is called “Lange Anna” (tall Anna). Most people will recognise it, even when not have been there.

The island is a huge red sandstone in the middle of the North sea. Because of the relative soft and porous material rain and salt water eat up the stone. Decades ago, people tried to save the island from the sea by building a concrete wall at this side of the island, because it is the weather side. Nearly all storms attack this side of the island.

There is a path between the concrete wall and the foot of the cliff. But, access is forbidden because of the danger. Parts of the cliff might fall down of huge waves might come over the concrete wall. A huge gate keeps people out of here. A different perspective on the Tall Anna and a better view on the concrete wall you can see in my last weeks Travel Tuesday post.

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at here site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

art, landscape, long exposure, photography, seasons, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 4-39

 

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole. Look at her site on Thursday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!

landscape, people, photography, travel, world

Strokkur Geyser

600_1291-e_wDid you already missed it? Here it is! the big geyser, who is source of the name geyser.

Be prepared to get wet, when visiting it. Be prepared to watch the direction, of the wind. I really warn you to be very careful. When arriving at the geyser park, probably lots of people are already there and stand around the big pond and waiting for the next eruption. Every few minutes a huge fountain springs out of the pond. This is, because the water is heated up in the ground and the wight of the water above is so heavy, that the hot water can’t come up. Thus, it heats up to more than 100°C and the water pillar is about 25 – 35 meter high!

As I mentioned before, lots of people standing around the pond waiting for the next fountain as you can see in the photo above, but on one side, nearly nobody is waiting. Why? That’s not because of a bad sight, no, but because the wind blows the hot water from the fountain in that direction. And that’s why I said, be very, very careful!

Take care!

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