architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

The school at La Sagrada Familia

600_7589_wRight next to the church you can find a small school set up for the workers kids to educate them and to teach them. In that time educate was a rare and expensive good. By teaching the workers kids, they offered them a career as a worker on the building site. While teaching them the basic math and tool handling they were able to get skilled and qualified workers. On the other hand, the kids got an opportunity get a job and to make their living. Keep in mind, other big cathedrals were constructed and build for at least decades. The construction of the cathedral in Cologne, for example, lasted more than 600 years! Thus, several generations of people were supposed to make their living on working on this cathedral. And, even after finishing such a building, some stonecutters will stay with the cathedral works to renew and repairs several parts every now and than.

Take care!

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architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

Below La Sagrada Familia

 

600_7555_wBelow the church you can visit the workers area. Here you can find old paintings, plans, small model of different parts and so on.

You can reach this area also from the place before Christmas front. Leave the building and turn right. Follow the path leading you down, below the building.

Here, you can also find one of the two gift shops. 🙂 (The other one is on the Easter front side).

Take care!

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architecture, art, history, photo-of-the-day, photography, technic, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 40

dsc_6816-s_wFor this weeks Monochrome Madness I want to take you to France. This is Abbaye de Jumièges in the Normandy. I took it a few years ago in April in early spring.

I picked it and processed it again with Tonalty Pro for this post. I gave it a slight vintage look, because in my opinion this look supports the mood of this photo.

As usual I started with preset and modified it afterwards. Therefore I gave it a slight sepia toning, a slight vignette to simulate a faint lens and a frame that brings a used-look. I know, there are many people, who don’t like frames around photos. But especially in photos with a vintage look, I like frames.

You know, I started photography many years ago and during my early years I also took many photos on black-and-white film. And, I also developed these films on my own im my own darkroom. I also did my own prints. Every sheet of paper had to be put under the enlarger and was hold by small plates to ensure, the paper lays flat under the enlarger. And, guess what, these plates hindered the light to exposure the covered parts of the paper and … left the frame!

So, you know, why I like frames around my bw photos every now and then.

Take care!

(as always: click on the photo to see them in a bigger size)

 

 

architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

Inside of La Sagrada Familia

600_7521-e_wHere we are! Inside one of the most amazing buildings I’ve ever seen!

This church has extremely much light inside, compared to other churches. Not only because of the glass windows at every side, but also from above. The whole church is inspired by a forest. Huge trees (the columns) are carrying the roof of leaves and branches. Between these leaves the natural light is able to reach the ground. Here you have the same, light channels are leading light from the sky inside the church. Also a technique, Antonio Gaudi used before: in Palau de la Musica. Even the big plates with the symbols of the evangelists are illuminated from behind by natural light.

The photo above was my first photo inside, right on our way to the towers, when the inside wasn’t much crowded. On the other hand, this inner circle with the benches was guarded, to give prayers a room.

Take care!

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architecture, art, history, photo-of-the-day, photography, technic, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 38

600_7496-ec_wTodays photo for Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness is taken in Barcelona earlier this year. Those, who follow my blog on a regular basis, might have recognized the photo. I was one of the photos in the gallery from the towers of La Sagrada Familia and I showed it last week already. But, that’s not completely true.

Although the photo, taken inside one of the towers, is a natural-born monochromatic photo, I converted it to bw with MacPhun Tonality Pro. I started again with one of the basic presets and adjusted the controls to bring out the fine structures in the stones. (btw. just in case, anyone is interested in a complete walk-through, just drop me a line).

These towers are really tight and you really need your hands. I guess, each stop is only 50 cm broad and you can’t pass anyone before you, expect on one of the few platforms or bridges to the neighbor towers. As you can see, you have a handrail on the right. On the left you have none, but the staircase is so steep, that the winding stone limiting the steps will be your handrail on to left.

The photo is taken handhold with an ultra-wide lens, a so-called fisheye. Beside carrying a tripod is forbidden, as I mentioned in my post last week, you won’t have enough room to set it up. Thus, your camera should be able to bring good results even in high iso. The downside of using a fisheye is, pay attention to your feet, hands, jacket and other visitors. You will definitely have some disturbing objects in your photo, if you don’t.

Take care!

(as always: click on the photos to see them in a bigger size)

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Btw. I’d encourage you to give it a try. You can download a trial version for free and you can still use a 10% discount by using this code: solaner10