architecture, art, culture, travel, world

¡Adios! Cuba

600_4269-e_wMany years ago here was a song popular with this line in the chorus (I translate it for you into English, while the song is in German): “Everything has an end, but only the sausage has two of them”.

This post is the end of my series on Cuba. I hope, you liked it. But, don’t be afraid, next week I start the next series.

Here’s my résumé on Cuba: It’s a nice country, friendly and open-minded people. A country with some problems, but the people try to manage them by creating new ideas. Cuba is undergoing huge changes currently and I guess, during the next few years it will change more than during the last 50 years.

Instead of saying “Goodbye” I’d say  more likely the German “Auf Wiedersehen” (see you again) or the French “Au revoir!”.

In case, you have Cuba on your bucket list, I’d recommend to go as soon as possible and don’t wait too long. There is so much changing, you’d probably miss that original spirit of Cuba. I guess, I already wrote more on this in an earlier post.

Take care!

landscape, photography, travel, world

remains of Sandy

600_8334-e_wDo you remember Sandy, the heavy hurricane in the Caribbean from December 2012? Well, Cayo Levisa also was hit quite hard. Many mangroves were removed from the shore, trees were cut and several other damages. The hotel, consisting of about 80 log cabins and a central house of stone with the reception and the dining room, didn’t show any damages.

I guess, it will last many years, until the nature recovers from that storm.

Take care!

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landscape, photography, travel, world

cooling down on Cayo Levisa

600_8510-e_wAs I wrote in my last post, it was quite cool on Cayo Levisa because of the wind after the storm over the sea. As you can see in the photos nearly no-one is on the beach and the wind brings high waves. Also, the palm branches are bent by the heavy wind.

Our stay here was planed for being a beach holiday with swimming, diving and snorkeling. Instead, I walked around wearing more clothes as during the last days and enjoyed the nature.

I attached a few more photos than usual in this posts gallery at the end of this post. I hope, you enjoy them.

Take care!

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landscape, photography, travel, world

transit to Cayo Levisa

600_8551-e_wCayo Levisa is a small island at the north shore of Cuba, right opposite to Florida. The bus needed more than two hours for the distance of about 50 kilometers from Viñales to the small ferry harbor, because of the very bad roads. The first 30 kilometers were quite fine, like most of the Cuban streets we saw. But, the remaining 20 kilometers were very bad.

We arrived quite early at the ferry harbor. While waiting for the ferry, we got notice of a  coming up very slowly. It seemed, the car’d have a technical problem. When the car finally arrived at the parking ground next to the bar where we were waiting, we noticed, the car was a rental car and 4 young ladies came off. They checked the engine and some more parts. Some Cuban people also looked for the car. As far as I understood, the front axle or a wheel was damaged because the driver didn’t pay enough attention to the street or was too careless. I don’t know about the end of the story, because the ferry arrived and we got on board for our passage to Cayo Levisa. About an hour later we arrive on Cayo Levisa.

Unfortunately the same afternoon we were able to see a heavy tropical storm on the sea and the sky became cloudy and gray – no more tropical feelings 😦 This kept on until the next afternoon, when the sun came back. But, with a strong and cold wind. Being at the beach was quite difficult. Strong tropical sun forced us to put some clothes away, but the wind forced us to up them on again. I’ll tell a bit more in my next post.

Take care!

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landscape, photography, travel, world

Cueva del Indio

600_7910-s_wis a cave near by Vinales. For an entrance fee of 5 CUC you can visit the first dry part of the cave and get a boat transit to a flooded part of the inner cave as well as getting transported to  the exit by boat.

The ground of the cave is covered by plan concrete and equipped by a few steps. Some passages are very low and you have to pass them ducked.

Tha cave itself is washed out by water and thus quite interesting.

It’s only a short stop near the road for about an hour or so. I guess, you need more time for all the gift shops at the exit after leaving the boat, then for visiting the cave itself. Btw. you can even only visit the gift shops without visiting the cave. But, in that case, you have to find the exit on you own. Hint: look for the parking ground (located left to the entrance) and you will see a bunch of small log cabins at the caves exit. You can also find a bar for getting a refreshment right next to the cave’s exit.

Take care!

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culture, landscape, photography, travel, world

A hiking trip to Los Acuáticos

600_8178-e_wLos Acuáticos de Viñales is a tiny village at the side of one of the hills above the Valley of Viñales. The path to that village looks more like a dry riverbed than a path. It’s narrow, steep and stony. You really need solid shoes for that trip. And you need a local guid to find you way. Neither street signs nor direction signs will help you find this village. According to our guide, there are only about 12 people are still living in Los Acuáticos. 

The name was given to the village, when an old, wise woman lived there like a hermit. She was a healer and was assumed to be able to heal with water. In the rush time, there were 60 people living there. But now, since the old woman passed away several decades ago, more and more people moved away to find another place, where living is a bit easier. The remaining families are still farmer and work in their steep fields as you can see in the photo gallery at the end of the post. Continue reading “A hiking trip to Los Acuáticos”

culture, flowers, meeting, photography, travel, world

growing tobacco

600_7672-e_wGrowing tobacco is hard work. It’s harder than growing i.e. corn, potatoes or grain. That’s because the farmer has to prepare his patch first with the plough and saw the seeds. But, he also has to go in his patch every day to cut the blossoms and pick unwanted leaves. It reminded me to the  wine growers work.

Everything is done by manual work. Ploughs and carriages are pulled by oxen. We didn’t see any machine in the fields.

Take care.

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culture, flowers, meeting, photography, travel, world

making cigars

600_7878-e_wLast week I wrote about how I met two tobacco farmers and showed a few photos. I also told about the process how to prepare the tobacco leaves for making cigars. Today I continue on this.

In the photo above, you can see a tobacco patch to the left and a drying house in the back, where the leaves are hung up for drying. The process for creating a cigar from the dry leaves is quite simple as you can see from the gallery at the bottom of this post. Young and soft leaves are in the core, wrapped by older and bigger leaves. The cover leave is wrapped outside and glued with a fluid.

Each leave is cut along the finning (leaf vein). The vein is never used for cigars. The vein is the part of the leaf with the highest level of nicotine and other chemicals that make smoking so dangerous. On the other hand, for cigarettes the whole leaves are shredded, so that a cigarette is more dangerous for one’s health than smoking a cigar.

At last the ready cigars were put into the wooden form for a few weeks to make them resistant against self dissolving.  But, you could also start to smoke one at once, if you want to.

Take care.

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culture, flowers, meeting, technic, travel, world

visiting a tobacco farmer

600_7692-s_wAs I mentioned in my last post, we also visited tobacco farmers. One got the patches from his father 5 years ago, when his father was 80 years old and too old to do that work anymore. He told us much about producing cigars, while the other one showed us, how to assemble a cigar. The farmers get the seeds from the government. They grow the plants and when they get a certain hight, the start to harvest the first leaves, those at the bottom. They become the outer cover sheet. Later the plants start blooming and the blooms have to be cut and given back to the government. Also, the government get’s 80% of the dried leaves, while the farmers are allowed to keep the remaining 20% for their own use. This is the source for the cigar sellers in the cities I mentioned earlier.

The government operated fabrics assemble their cigars by using leaves from different growing places (full sun, part shadow or shadow), different tobacco species and different farms. The leave ware not only hung up for drying, they also voted by certain marinade for the fermentation process. Each farmer has his own secret receipt for this marinade. On the other hand, the leaves of farmers cigars are all from their own patches. That’s why cigars from different brands have different tastes.

On the table in the above photo you can see the tools needed for assembling a cigar, 3 ready cigars and a few roles / bundles of farmer’s cigars covered by a thin layer of wood as a very basic variant of humidor. In the background you can see many bunches of drying tobacco leaves, as we are in the drying house at the moment. Here in the drying house you have a very distinct smell of fall, autumn foliage and cigar boxes (as I remember from my grandfathers cigar boxes) or tobacco shops. The smell of cigars is already there, but it also smells like fall, when the trees lost their leaves, that are laying on the ground and start drying and fouling. Although, the tobacco leaves won’t start fouling, but drying.

Next week, I’ll focus on the patches and the work outside.

Take care!

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animals, photography, travel, world

some cuban birds – part IV

600_8203-ec_wThis is the final post in this little series on cuban birds. In case, you missed one of the previous posts, you can find them here.

In this post I want to introduce you to the cuban national bird, the Cuban Trogon. You can see it in the photo above.

The other two birds on the photos in this posts gallery can be found in a wider area. The brown pelican is at home in the whole Caribbean area as well as in california. While the turkey vulture can be found in all parts of south, middle and south america.

Have fun.

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animals, photography, travel, world

some cuban birds – part III

600_7172-s_wThis week I have another continuation of the series on cuban birds. I assembled some photos of different kinds of egrets I found in different parts of Cuba. In the gallery below you can see photos of Little Blue Herons, Tricolored Herons, Snowy Egrets and Cattle Egrets on the fields following the plough or cows and horses, hoping for an easy catch.

Most of the time, I saw them standing on the fields or in / beside the water hunting and fishing. Surprisingly, they were less shy, then those here in Europe. It was quite easy to come near (20 – 30 meters) without disturbing them. Also, they only flew a few meters before landing again. So, I don’t have any photo of a flying egret or heron.

In the photo above you can search and find 3 different egret species. Try to find them. It’s not that easy. One more post on the birds in the queue. So, stay tuned.

In case, you missed one of the previous posts, don’t hesitate to have a look now.

Take care!

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animals, photography, travel, world

some cuban birds – part II

600_6872-ec_wThis is a continuation of last weeks post. There were so many different birds, that I split the post for not to overstress you with all the photos. And, as I wrote in my last post, I don’t the names of the birds, expect the cuban emerald hummingbird. So, if you know one of the names, don’t hesitate to use the comment box below, to send me the name.

In a following post I’ll show some more of the astonishing birds.

Take care!

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animals, photography, travel, world

some cuban birds – part I

600_4960-ec_wEvery now and then during the last couple of posts I mentioned the cuban birds. I really love these colorful animals. All of the photos shown in the gallery below are taken in the wild, but without any feeding or bushwhacking. All the photos were taken by chance during hikes or in the trees and bushes beside the streets.

Unfortunately I don’t know all of their names. Maybe, one of you is able to help me out.

The egrets, hummingbird, grackle, pygmy owl and the falcon are easy to find. But the others are quite harder to find. So, if you know one of the names, don’t hesitate to use the comment box below, to send me the name.

In a following post I’ll show some more of the astonishing birds.

Take care!

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landscape, photography, seasons, travel, world

A hike at Las Terrazas

600_6958-s_wIn my last post I introduced you to the community of Las Terrazas.

Today I want to take you on a hike through the forests on the hills around Las Terrazas.  You don’t need hiking shoes or a backpack full of water for out little trip, but I recommend both in case you go on that trip yourself.

As I mentioned earlier, it’s green here. Many plants are covering the ground. So, we found orchids, and many other plants, I didn’t knew before.

The most interesting tree is the tourist tree (Bursera simaruba). You can see it on the photo on the right. When in the sun, the bark becomes red first and than falls down, just like the skin of the tourists.  🙂

We also met many bird. I’ll put them up in another separate post.

Take care

and stay tune on, what else the forests hides.

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landscape, photography, seasons, travel, world

Las Terrazas

600_6932-e_wLas Terrazas is a cuban community. After a deforestation the people build flat terraces in the sides of the hills and planted trees again. Now, the have forests again around their village. They can pay their living by the products of the forests without cutting trees and by showing their community and their achievements to visitors.

More on the plants, flowers and animals we saw on out guided tour through the hills, I’ll put in another post.

Take care.

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