abstract, landscape, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Monday 8-43

sculptured by the wind

 

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It’s sometimes hard to find images fitting to a certain challenge. For these tasks, I’m using the help of Excire Foto. I told the software where my image library is located and it starts analyzing the images. It recognizes the main colors in the images as well as the contents (what is in the images) and tags them automatically. Later, I can use the user interface to search for images with certain tags. Currently, you can save a few bucks when ordering Excire Foto, because it’s on sale.

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Take care!

landscape, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Monday 8-41

Today, I really encourage you to enlarge the image by clicking on it. This panorama is assembled from 22 single images. A panorama was necessary to capture the enormous size of this canyon. It’s not the first huge canyon (the 3rd image) I stood above but comparing the size of the canyon with the little water in the river at the ground it feels like standing on the moon.

Unfortunately, the river became nearly invisible after the sun climbed higher to enlight the ground of the canyon,

Take care!

animals, mammal, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Monday 8-38

Some of you might already have seen this image on Instagram. It was so great to be able to have the cheetah coming so close to me and accepting me as a distant visitor (literally he was simply ignoring me, and that was perfectly fine)

In this image, I really, really love how the low standing sun models the body of this beautiful cat. Thus, the monochrome version is much nicer than the color version.

Take care!

animals, bird, nature, photography, review, wildlife

Throwback Thursday: orxy antelope

oryx antelope

Although they seem very intense colored with the strong and distinct bars on their face, body, and legs, when looking at them directly, they vanish easily in their surroundings in the Kalahari desert and where else you spot them in Namibia. Regardless if the landscape is gray or reddish, they merge with the background. It’s really fascinating.

The first image was taken at 8:45 a.m. The second at 6:30 a.m. and the third at 8:40 a.m.

The last one is taken at 11 a.m. Do you find the second oryx in the image?

As usual, click on an image to enlarge it.

Take care!

 

animals, astro, bird, landscape, nature, night, photo-of-the-day, photography, plants, star, travel, world

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge 178: “My choice: a small Namibia selection”

Today’s host for The Lens-Artists Photo-Challenge is Tina. Her topic for today is “you choose” 😊 How funny. From her comments on my post last week I know, she’s quite eager to see some images from Namibia. Thus, I made a tiny selection from the images taken there.

I’m still in quarantine. Because I’m working from home, the two past weeks didn’t look different than the months before. Nevertheless, I was able to develop a couple of images. I’m not done developing my images from Namibia, but there are some I can show right now.

As usual, click on an image to enlarge it.

Take care!

photo-of-the-day, photography

Lens-Artists Photo Challange 177: “Celebrating”

As I wrote on Thursday, I’m back from my trip to Namibia. Thus, my pause in participating in the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge has ended. This week, Amy is our host, and she wants us to show images celebrating something.

December is a month of a huge variety of different reasons to celebrate: Advent, Chanukah, Christmas, Year’s End, 13 birthdays in my family and my close friends, and I guess, you can name many more depending on the region or country you’re living. Not counting all the other requests like i.e. for visiting Christmas Markets, company Christmas celebrations, Advent celebrations of churches, schools, kindergartens, associations, and other local communities. You know, what I mean. December is a very, very busy month when thinking of celebrating something.

Therefore, I opted for something completely different. I picked this image taken Friday night last week in Namibia. It was our last evening in the wilderness. The next morning (Saturday) we went back to Windhoek to fly back home on Sunday evening. That last night was the end of a wonderful trip through a wonderful and amazing country. On that last trip, we saw again some examples of the wonderful fauna of Namibia embedded in the amazing landscape of the Kalahari desert. It ended with celebrating sundown.

Besides some beverages, we had some fruits, sweet pastries, thin Namibian air-dried sausages like salami but thinner than my small finger, and of course biltong (coin-sized dried meat pieces).

P.S. when looking at the post now, I’m thinking if I should also file it for last week’s LAPC called “one image, one story” hosted by Ann-Christine.

Take care!

photography, summer, travel

Throwback Thursday: I’m back …

… from Namibia!

While writing this, I’m sitting in Frankfurt waiting for my connection flight on my trip back home from Windhoek, the capital of Namibia in southern Africa.

During the last two weeks, I was exploring the south of Namibia. We were traveling the deserts, steppes, and savannas of Namibia between Windhoek in the North and Lüderitz in the South. Namibia changed my image of an African country. I was faced with a modern and clean country. Covid 19 incidence of 1.x (raising up to 2.3 by the end of our trip). I was very surprised, how serious the Namibian people are handling Covid: entering shops, restaurants, and other buildings only when wearing a nose-and-mouth-covering mask and in the entrance area of each shop a hand sanitizer was set up. In my opinion, this is a reason for the extremely low incidence rate in comparison with other countries

It was a very relaxed stay (roundtrip of about 3,000 km) to see the country and many animals besides the roads. Btw. roads: in the past, I experienced the Icelandic gravel roads and bad roads in Scotland. But in Namibia, the road quality is even worse. Most of the roads are not paved and even the paved ones are not as smooth as we know it from middle Europe. Instead, the gravel roads have a lot of bumps and potholes, and they are very dusty (dust devils can be spotted quite easily).

Despite these ‘problems’, it was a very nice trip, well organized, and equipped with a skilled local driver. This was his first job after nearly 2 years of sitting home unemployed because of the pandemic. So, I was experiencing again an empty country. But I’m feeling very sorry for the people depending on tourism. Without tourists, they can’t earn money to make their living.

My aim for this trip wasn’t to go on a safari. Instead, I wanted to see the deserts of Namibia: like Kalahari, Stone-Namib, Sand-Namib. End of November, the rain season is about to start. So, the country was already dried out. To stress this fact, we were even greeted by burning houses on the ground of the lodge of our first stay. In less than an hour, three 2-floor houses burned down completely. The trigger was a spark issued by a workman’s tool.

You might know, the land, now being Namibia, once was a German colony more than 100 years ago and then taken over by the British Empire followed by South Africa. In 1994 Namibia became independent from South Africa after the end of the South African apartheid regime. But there are still very strong connections to South Africa. Nevertheless, different than South Africa, they made a couple of good decisions: no condemnation of white farmers, picking English as the only official language instead of choosing one of the 11 local languages (plus Afrikaans and German). So, all people speak at least two languages: their mother tongue and English (sometimes in total 3 or 4).

I was meeting black people speaking German perfectly, what a surprise. I was happy to see, that the people connect Germany positively and they are proud of their country.

To name my favorites of the trip, I have to start with the animals we saw at the Lodges, in the National Parks, and besides the roads. I don’t want to bore you with a list. Next, I would name the dunes of Sossusvlei / Deathvlei where the dunes of very fine red sand can easily grow higher than 300 meters (about 1,000 feet), the Quiver tree forest (endemic plants relative to the Alow Vera), and the formerly forbidden zone near Lüderitz where the Diamonds were found with the ghost town Kolmanskop (Kolmanskuppe), a former German mining company town.

I’m very glad to have seen Oryx a couple of times, the signature animal of Namibia. They are well adapted to live and survive in these dry and scraggy landscapes. And they are beautiful. Here I have one for you, I met in Sossusvlei. I guess, this image itself is a symbol for Namibia: a lot of space to roam (only 2.3 million people living in a country of nearly 3 times the size of Germany, where we have more than 83 million people ), deserts are dominating the land, but there is still life (the green). We were in Deadvlei, a part of Sossusvlei in the early morning because the shuttle service stops at 3 p.m. because of the heat. Two weeks earlier, a Frenchman died here because of the heat. they found him the next morning terribly treated by the sun and looking like being a double of Freddy Krüger.

P.S. While you’re reading this, I’m already back at home for 3,5 days and I have to admit, I’m still freezing a lot. More than a 30°C difference in temperature between Namibia and Germany. I want the warmth back or alternatively back into the warmth. But, I guess, I have to dream about it ☹️. Instead, I’m in quarantine for 2 full weeks because I came back from a virus variant area. What the f**k. How can Namibia be a virus variant area, when there is nearly no-one infected. But I can’t change this, so I have to love and reschedule a few appointments.

Stay tuned and take care!