animals, art, flowers, insect, macro, nature, photography, plants, seasons, world

Throwback Thursday: A hover-fly and an Ad

APS-C, f16, 1/1000, ISO 2,800, 105mm (~157mm FX)

Today I have not only an image for you, but also a special offer. Skylum is offering their software Luminar 2018 with a special discount. The offer is starting today and valid until Sunday.

The above macro image shows a hover-fly on an Echinacea blossom. It’s taken by using a 105mm macro lens attached to a camera with an APS-C sized sensor in the early evening hours. Afterwards it’s developed from raw by using Luminar 2018.

Insects are very quickly moving animals. Additionally, their movements are nearly unpredictable. Even when sitting on blossoms for having a meal, they are constantly moving around. So, you have to use very short shutter-speeds when taking photographs beside a quick auto-focus. When using a macro lens for taking photos from small or tiny things like insects, you have to use a small aperture (= high number) to get images that are sharp for more than a tiny area. You know, the size of the field of depth depends on the focal length and the f-stop as well as the distance between your lens and the subject: the smaller the aperture, the bigger the field of depth and the longer the focal length the smaller the field of depth.

Both of these have an impact on the resulting image: a short shutter-speed only lets the light reach the sensor for a very short moment, while the small aperture limits the amount of light. So, what can we do to get properly exposed images? Right, we must increase the ISO, the sensitivity of the sensor. But, increasing the sensitivity also has a con: the digital noise in the image also increases and the fine structures might vanish. You might ask, why do I tell you all this technical stuff.

The reason is, nobody wants to look at noisy images with no structures. So, you have to use a software for developing your images, which is capable of eliminating the noise but preserves the structures.

In this image I still have all the structures: the fine hairs, the structures of the facet-eyes and the pollens. I also got rid of the noise from the background. So, Luminar did a great job again.

You can download a free demo (fully functional for 14 days) and test it on your own computer with you own images.

Take care!

(this post contains affiliate links)

architecture, culture, flowers, history, photography, seasons, travel, world

in the backyards

600_5779-sc_wUsually backyards are closed for the public. But some public houses also have public backyards. In this case, we visited a former hospital, now a public library, that used to be part of a monastery. The library’s main entrance is right in this alleyway.

Because of its history being a monastery, you can find a large backyard equipped with a fountain and a surrounding cloister.

I was very surprised of the trees full of fruits: oranges! I’ve never seen oranges in a tree before. Although I knew, that oranges need 14 months to get ripe, I was very surprised to find so much fruits in the trees. On the other hand, I won’t expect to see orange trees in the public as street plants or in public parks.

Take care!

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art, culture, photo-of-the-day, photography

Come to the orange land

Even this picture look like taken using an intense orange filter in front of the camera lens, I can assure, I don’t. It’s also not taken from any movie created in the 1970s.

The aisle is illuminated by orange light and I can’t say, if the walls are painted orange or not – but I think they are and ceiling and floor, too.

It’s really interesting to stand in a room illuminated in such a different, unusual way. It’s a really funny experience.

Movies like “The black hole”, “Star Trek”, “2001” and similar ones came into my mind, just because of the color. Fascinating!