architecture, culture, history, landscape, people, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: Salzwiesen

Looking to the seaside from the top of the dike. Interestingly, no beach and no water are in this place (and many others, too). Every now and then, the flood covers the area. Thus the soil is very salty and only very specialized plant can grow here. It’s not possible to use it for growing food or building houses.

But, It’s an area absolutely necessary for some birds. So, many of these areas are preserved at certain times of the year.

In German, these area is called Salzwise (salt meadow or salt marsh).

Take care!

 

culture, food, people, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: German sushi

 

You know, sushi as a kind of Japanese food. It’s (usually raw) fish, rolled in rice and a leaf of alga or kelp.

Germans also have their kind of sushi: Fischbr√∂tchen ūüôā

It’s a roll with some kind of fish or with a fish¬†rissole. You can have it with fried fish, smoked fish or raw fish. Different kinds of fish are used for the different dishes.

On the right you can see a Matjes in the roll. Matjes is a young, raw herring. You can also have sour pickled herring (Bismarck-Hering). For smoked fish you can usually have salmon, mackerel, trout or eel. When in the right season you can also have you roll with cooked crabs.

Take care!

 

culture, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: shop

The sign above the entrance of this shop in the oldtown of Greetsiel says “Bauernladen”. Literally translated, this would be something like framers shop and proposes fresh product from a farm.

The sign beside the door says “Fischbr√∂tchen”. That’s fish in a roll. Either herring (Matjes or sour pickled), kipper (i.e. mackerel, eel, sprats or more seldom along the coast trout) or even crabs.

In the back you can see some products for tourists to buy as souvenirs.

Take care!

 

architecture, art, culture, history, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: traditional houses in the North of Germany

In the states of northern Germany, we have a tradition to build houses with the roof made of water reed. (btw. this plant is called Reed, Schilf or Rohr in German)

Once, each house has had such a roof. Than, only the houses of poor people. Nowadays, the situation has changed: only the rich ones can afford such a roof. It lasts approximately 30 years and is a natural air-condition. It keeps the cold outside during winter and the heat outside during summer.

The houses in the image above, are vacation homes and quite new. But, there are still many privat houses around with this kind of roof, too.

Take care!

 

architecture, cityscape, culture, history, people, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: A merchants house

Greetsiel has a long tradition of shipping. For centuries people along the costs made their living with fishing, whale catching and long-distance trading. Not only sailors came from these towns, also officers and captains. And these captains usually brought back lots of money (when they came back Рlots of men and ships got lost to the sea in those times).  So, in each town with a harbour you can find very gorgeous houses, once built by a captain.

Very often, such houses are near to the harbour. Often with a good view to the sea. These houses were to document the wealth of the owner (= builder)

 

Take care!