animals, art, flowers, insect, macro, nature, photography, plants, seasons, world

Throwback Thursday: green on lilac

I took this image in May 2010. I was out for photographing the wonderful blooming lilac with my macro lens. When checking the images on the tiny back screen of my camera, I noticed some fine lines crossing the whole image. What’s that? I feared, I might have harmed the lens or the sensor. So, I went home for checking the camera and the images.

Fortunately, my camera and my lens were not broken. Instead, accidentally I got a spider web between my camera and the lilac. So, I went back and tried hard to find the spider web again. This time, I even found the spider. See, how tiny it is compared to a single lilac blossom. It’s an Araniella cucurbitina, sometimes called the “cucumber green spider”. It becomes only 6mm (females) and 4mm (male) ‘big’.

Take care!

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animals, art, flowers, insect, landscape, macro, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, plants, world

Wordless Wednesday: found in lilac

Araniella cucurbitina, sometimes called the “cucumber green spider” / K√ľrbisspinne

 

Take care!

landscape, nature, photography, seasons, world

Weekly Photo Challenge: enveloped

600_1003-e_wWhen I read this weeks topic for the weekly photo challenge at “The Daily Post” I’ve had to think a moment for a reasonable photo. It topic is: enveloped.

First of all, an envelope used for sending a letter via the postal service came put to my mind. But, also power wires or streets are enveloping our nice little planet ūüôā

I picked something similar, a spider’s web. It’s used for enveloping the spiders food and, in this case, it is enveloped in dew.

Take care!

(as usual, you can see the photo enlarged, when clicking in it)

animals, art, culture, landscape, technical, travel, world

Art attack at the horticultural show

600_9687-e_w Two weeks ago I was at a horticulture or gardening show. One stand offered garden sculptures. I guess, everyone knows about such sculptures to set up in the garden. But these were very interesting for me. Each one need about 1 m² for setup.

Both photos are shot using a very special lens, called fisheye. This lens has a special feature to show everything at a range of 180¬į. But, it has a strong distortion in case you’re tilting the camera and move the horizon from the middle up or down. You can easily see, I tilted the camera upwards in both photos, but the tilting angle for the spider was less than for the mantis in the photo¬†above.

600_9691-e_wPhotographing these sculptures from an usual point of view is much more than looking in a catalog. Using the fisheye lens and photographing upwards brings you more in the creepy situation like another insect would experience the attack of one of these dangerous predators.

I don’t wanna frighten you. Enjoy the photos and

Take care!