art, culture, photo-of-the-day, photography

Lens-Artists Photo Challange 121: “focus on the subject”

This week we have another educational topic as the theme for The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: “Focus on the subject” and Patti is our host.

“Focus on the subject ” – What does this mean. You know, sometimes you’re photographing a scene or a subject and in the end, the image does not represent what you’ve seen or felt. How can you change this? By focusing on the subject. It seems, at this point the cat bites in her own tail. So, let me explain this a bit. Focusing means you need to set the main subject in the most prominent place of the image and arrange all the other parts in a way to support the main subject. Hugh, very theoretical, right. Never mind, I’m explaining it now.

A couple of weeks ago, we had the topic “cropping” for LAPC. Cropping is a way of supporting the main subject. Here I’m not necessarily talking about cropping in post-production. Instead, use your zoom lens or decrease the distance between you and your subject. Especially, this is very important when composing your image. Just like Robert Capa said, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you weren’t close enough”. And he was photographing soldiers during wars while fighting.

Giving the main subject room to breathe is also a technic of focussing on the subject as well as changing your point of view. Leading lines are also an important technique for supporting your main subject.

 

In case, I would be asked to organize a photo challenge, I’d already know the subject. It would help training the eye and focus on the point. In the past, I wrote down some rules to have in mind when trying to participate in a photo contest. Most of these rules are also to consider when you’re trying to focus on your subject.

Take care!

architecture, culture, history, photography, technic, world

Lost

dsc_3439-e_wToday’s assignment from The Daily Post for photographers is ‘Lost‘.

I picked this photograph of a lost alley in the former coking plant.

It’s always interesting to examine places not visited or in use for a long time. Time changes everything.

For examining lost places, there are a few rules:

– security first
– never go alone
– never touch or change anything
– never leave anything, but foot steps in the dust
– never take anything with you, but photographs