history, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: set in relation

It’s always nice to look at epic landscapes. But, to really understand the dimensions, you need something that you already know. In this case, the tiny human doesn’t disturb the scene, instead, it gives scale and you can see how big everything is.

Take care!

 

culture, history, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: everything is wet

Let’s stay a bit longer at the Fairy pools. Do you remember the big rock in the water? We had quite bad weather when we were there. After each image, the front lens needed to be dried and cleaned because of the rain. Another side effect of the rain was, there was a lot of water in the river.

Take care!

 

culture, history, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: watching the water rushing by

Let’s stay a bit longer at the Fairy pools. We had quite bad weather when we were there. After each image, the front lens needed to be dried and cleaned because of the rain. Another side effect of the rain was, there was a lot of water in the river.

Take care!

 

culture, history, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: watching the water rushing by

 

Full frame, 110 mm, ISO 50, f22, 3s

Let’s stay a bit longer at the Fairy pools. We had quite bad weather when we were there. After each image, the front lens needed to be dried and cleaned because of the rain. Another side effect of the rain was, there was a lot of water in the river.

Take care!

 

culture, history, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Travel Tuesday: at the Fairy pools


This area is called Fairy pools. It’s not far from the parking ground, but it’s only a very steep path leading you down from the parking ground to the river. Next, you have to climb uphill beside the rivers to reach the part which is called fairy pools because of the many basins where the water is much calmer than in the other parts. To be honest, I can’t imagine anyone would be brave enough to enter the water.

Exact one year later, a few friends of mine also came here for taking photos from the rushing water and the waterfalls, but, only a little water was in the river and amazingly some people took a bath in some of the pools 😳.

In the next image, you can have a look back to see, the path. In the center of the image, you can see a bright spot. That’s a white caravan parking in the parking ground. According to my friends, now you have to pay a fee. When we were there, the parking was free.

The whole trip from the parking ground down to the river, up to the uppermost waterfall and back lasted about 2,5 hours. While the path from the parking ground down to the river was steep but graveled. The path along the river uphill was only a trail. The trail itself was connected to the graveled path by this nice bridge.

 

After the uppermost waterfall, the river runs in a couple of beds and not a single one. You can jump over at least some of them, but the scene is less interesting compared to the part you’ve already seen when reaching the last waterfall. To give you an additional motivation to turn back at this point, the government has set up a (small) sign advising you to turn back because at that point the wilderness begins, which might be quite dangerous for you.

Take care!

 

art, landscape, nature, photo-of-the-day, photography, travel, world

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #80 – Leading Lines

In photography as well as in painting you have certain ‘rules’ to follow when composing your image. OK, there is no must, and sometimes it is even necessary to break these rules.

‘Leading lines’ is one of them, and the rule of thirds is another important one. ‘Leading lines’ means you integrated one or more visual lines inside the image in that way, that they catch your eye and lead it to the main subject.

Tina challenges us this week, to show images, where lines lead the eye to the main subject.

In this image, the main subject is the waterfall and the stairs coming from the lower left edge are leading with a positive diagonal upwards to the waterfall, while the waterfall is coming from the upper left corner (when only taking the bright and sunny part into account). In addition, they meet near the lower-right crossing of the rule-of-thirds. And the path-waterfall-connection is framed by two trees. Another rule is, to have the important parts brighter than the supplemental parts.

Don’t get me wrong. You can definitely make good images without following these ‘rules’. And sometimes it’s even necessary to break the rules to get a great image. But in general, they are the factor, that makes an image pop out of the mass or distinguish between good and great. So, my advice is, first learn the rules and follow them before you start breaking them intentionally.

Here’s a summary of 9 easy rules for building your image composition on:

  1. balance the horizon
  2. leading lines
  3. try to find diagonals (preferably from the lower left to the upper right corner = positive)
  4. rule of thirds
  5. frame your main subject
  6. bright vs. dark
  7. prefer landscape mode as it is more natural for our seeing experience
  8. use completing colors (red and green or blue and yellow)
  9. fill the frame

Take care!

art, landscape, long exposure, nature, photography, travel, world

Monochrome Madness 5-08 / 214

This is my contribution to Monochrome Madness organized by Leanne Cole.

“Monochrome Madness” is now in its fifth year of existence. Look at Leanne’s site on Wednesday (Australian time), to see many more monochrome images created by many other talented photographers from all over the world.

I’d also encourage you to participate. The conditions are  published in each of her Monochrome Madness posts.

Take care!